Gender and Politics in India | Nana Ronger Itihas

 

Gender and Politics in India


India has a long history of gender inequality, and this has manifested itself in many areas including politics. Women in India have historically had less political representation and participation compared to men. However, there have been some positive developments in recent years.

The Constitution of India guarantees equal rights to all citizens, including the right to vote and stand for public office. In recent years, there have been efforts to increase the representation of women in politics through measures such as reserved seats for women in local government bodies and affirmative action for women in national elections.

Despite these efforts, women still face many challenges in the political arena. There are fewer women in political leadership positions compared to men, and women are often underrepresented in political parties and decision-making bodies. Violence and intimidation against women in politics is also a problem in India.

Overall, there is a need for further progress in promoting gender equality in Indian politics and ensuring that women have equal opportunities to participate and lead.

here are a few more points to consider:

• Women’s representation in the Indian parliament has increased in recent years, but it is still low compared to other countries. In the 2019 general elections, 14.3% of elected members of parliament were women, up from 11% in the 2014 elections. This is lower than the global average of 23.8%.

• There have been some notable female politicians in India, including Indira Gandhi, who was the prime minister of India for a total of 15 years, and current president of the Congress party, Sonia Gandhi. However, women are still underrepresented in leadership positions in Indian politics.


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• Political parties in India have been criticized for not doing enough to promote women’s representation. Some parties have reserved a certain number of seats for women, but these reserved seats are often given to the wives or daughters of male politicians, rather than being awarded on the basis of merit.

• Women in politics in India also face significant challenges and barriers, including violence and intimidation. There have been cases of female politicians being targeted with physical and sexual violence, and women are often subject to sexist and derogatory language and behavior.

• Civil society organizations and activists have been working to promote gender equality in Indian politics and increase the participation of women. This has included advocacy for measures such as reserved seats for women and quotas for women in political parties.


Problems of Gender and Politics in India

There are several problems related to gender and politics in India that contribute to the underrepresentation and marginalization of women in the political sphere:

1. Lack of women in leadership positions: Despite some progress in increasing the number of women in parliament, women are still underrepresented in leadership positions in Indian politics.

2. Lack of support for women in political parties: Political parties in India have been criticized for not doing enough to promote women’s representation. Some parties have reserved a certain number of seats for women, but these reserved seats are often given to the wives or daughters of male politicians, rather than being awarded on the basis of merit.

3. Violence and intimidation: Women in politics in India often face significant challenges and barriers, including violence and intimidation. There have been cases of female politicians being targeted with physical and sexual violence, and women are often subject to sexist and derogatory language and behavior.

4. Lack of awareness and political education: Many women in India lack the necessary political knowledge and skills to participate effectively in the political process. This can be due to a lack of access to education and information, as well as cultural and social barriers.

5. Stereotypes and biases: Women in politics in India often face negative stereotypes and biases that discourage their participation and leadership. This can include the belief that women are not capable of handling political responsibilities, or that they are not fit to hold public office.

6. Gender-based discrimination: Women in India face widespread discrimination and inequality in many areas of life, including politics. This can include discrimination in terms of access to education, employment, and other opportunities, which can make it harder for women to enter and succeed in the political arena.

7. Lack of role models: The lack of visible and successful female politicians in India can make it more difficult for women to see themselves as leaders and envision a career in politics. This can be compounded by the fact that women who do enter politics often face significant challenges and barriers.

8. Lack of financial resources: Political campaigns can be expensive, and women may be at a disadvantage in terms of access to financial resources to fund their campaigns. This can make it more difficult for women to enter and succeed in politics.

9. Lack of family and community support: In some cases, women may face resistance or lack of support from their families and communities when it comes to pursuing a career in politics. This can be due to cultural or social norms that discourage women from taking on leadership roles.

10. Lack of institutional support: There may be a lack of institutional support for women in politics in India, including a lack of policies and programs that promote women’s participation and leadership. This can make it harder for women to enter and succeed in politics.


Bibliography:

• “Gender and Politics in India” by Sarah Ansari and Avtar Brah (2008)

• “Women in Indian Politics: An Overview” by Seema Mustafa (2018)

• “The Political Participation of Women in India: Challenges and Opportunities” by Swati Bhardwaj (2016)

• “Gender and the Political System in India” by Zoya Hasan (2012)


E-bibliography:

• “Women in Indian
Politics: Challenges and Opportunities” by Sudha Pai (2015) available at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09718923.2015.11188791

• “Women’s Political
Participation in India: A Review of Literature” by Surabhi Singh and M.P.
Singh (2017) available at: https://www.ijsrp.org/research-paper-0317/ijsrp-p4237.pdf

• “Women and
Politics in India: Challenges and Opportunities” by Meenakshi Singh (2018)
available at: https://www.idsn.org/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2018/03/Women-and-politics-in-India-Challenges-and-opportunities.pdf

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