[New] Simon commission 1927 | Nana Ronger Itihas

 


[PDF] Simon commission 1927 
Simon Commission in India
When Simon Commission did come to India? 
What is the aim of the Simon Commission? 
Why was Simon Commission boycotted in India?
Simon commission 1927 
What is Simon Commission? 
Simon commission date 
Simon commission report 
Why did Indian protest against Simon commission 
Simon commissions go back 
Why did Simon commission come to India 
Simon commission UPSC


The Simon Commission was a British government commission that was sent to India in 1927 to report on the political situation in the country and to make recommendations for its future constitutional development. The commission was headed by Sir John Simon and was composed entirely of British politicians. It was met with widespread opposition and protests from Indian nationalists, who saw it as a symbol of British interference in Indian affairs and a lack of respect for Indian sovereignty. The commission’s report, which was released in 1930, was largely ignored by the British government and did not lead to any significant changes in Indian constitutional arrangements.

Here is more information about the Simon Commission:

The Simon Commission was established by the British government in November 1927, in the aftermath of the successful non-cooperation movement led by Mahatma Gandhi. The movement, which called for the withdrawal of British rule from India, had been suspended in 1922, and the British government had promised to hold a round table conference to discuss the future constitutional development of India. However, the conference did not take place, and instead, the government decided to send the Simon Commission to investigate the political situation in India and to make recommendations for its future.

The commission, which was composed of seven British politicians, arrived in India in February 1928 and was met with widespread opposition and protests. The Indian National Congress, the main nationalist political party in India, called for a boycott of the commission, and many Indians refused to meet with or cooperate with the commission. The commission was also met with large-scale protests and boycotts across the country, with many Indians seeing it as a symbol of British interference in Indian affairs and a lack of respect for Indian sovereignty.

Despite the opposition and boycotts, the Simon Commission went ahead with its work, and in 1930 it released a report that made several recommendations for the future constitutional development of India. The report called for the establishment of a federal system of government in India, with a strong central government and a degree of autonomy for the provinces. It also recommended the introduction of separate electorates for Muslims, a move that was opposed by the Indian National Congress and other nationalist groups.

Overall, the Simon Commission and its report were largely ignored by the British government and did not lead to any significant changes in Indian constitutional arrangements. The commission and its findings remain a controversial and significant event in the history of modern India and are remembered as a symbol of British imperialism and the struggle for Indian independence.


Bibliography:

“The Simon Commission and the Nationalist Response,” by Barbara D. Metcalf, in The Cambridge History of India, volume 4, part 2 (Cambridge University Press, 1988).

“The Simon Commission and the Boycott of 1928,” by Rajendra Prasad, in An Autobiography (Navajivan Publishing House, 1979).

“The Simon Commission and the Boycott of 1928,” by Jawaharlal Nehru, in An Autobiography (John Murray, 1936).

“The Simon Commission and the Demand for Swaraj,” by Mahatma Gandhi, in The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi (Publications Division, Government of India, 1998).

Leave a Comment